Back to category: History

Limited version - please login or register to view the entire paper.

Cause and Effect of the Spanish Inquistion

Cause and Effect of the Spanish Inquisition
The Spanish Inquisition was the most famous of the numerous Papal Inquisition that took place during the Middle Ages. In three hundred years that it lasted, the accused, which included Jews, Moors, Lutherans, and those who were accused of practicing witchcraft, had their possessions taken by the state, their fates tried in the papal courts, and their dignity trodden by the public. Nearly forty-five thousand cases were tried in Spain and its territories, but conflicting figures show the number dead; some say nearly thirteen thousand were burned at the stake and tortured, whereas some statistics show only about nine hundred died during the Inquisition (Henningsen, 110-120). Nevertheless, the Inquisition, as it should be, is a most frowned upon time in history; the crown’s motives were Machiavellian in nature and the papal and church’s motives were ecclesiastically bigoted.
In 1469, the marriage of Ferdinand V of Aragon to his cousin Isabe...

Posted by: Alyscia Yellowman

Limited version - please login or register to view the entire paper.